Oregon Smoke Information

Map Notes:


The map above is not able to show all state air quality monitors. To see the whole set, go to the left column, under Hot Links
and click on DEQ Air Quality map which will bring up a map with many additional state monitors. Round icons represent permanent state air quality monitors, triangular icons represent temporary smoke monitors (when deployed).


Friday, June 10, 2016

Keeping an eye on air quality

A number of tools are available to help you gauge air quality in your area. But one tool is right under your nose – well actually right above it. How far you can see on a given day can be a good indicator of air quality. The 5-3-1 visibility index can help you estimate smoke levels and decide what precautions to take.

This exercise will give you a good excuse to step outside – on a clear day.

First, determine your visual range by scoping out distant targets or familiar landmarks that you know are a given distance away.

If you can see 15 miles away the air quality is generally good. In the 5- to 15-mile range air quality is moderate and probably healthy except for sensitive groups such as those with respiratory conditions, particularly the closer to the 5-mile marker you get.

Here’s where the 5-3-1 index kicks in:

Under 5 miles
Air quality is unhealthy for young children, adults over 65, pregnant women and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness. People in these groups should minimize outdoor activity.

Under 3 miles
Air quality is unhealthy for everyone. Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness should avoid all outdoor activities.

Under 1 mile
Air quality is very unhealthy, and in some cases may be hazardous. Everyone should avoid all outdoor activities.

Remember, if you feel like you are having health effects from smoke exposure, take extra care to stay inside or get to an area with better air quality.

Learn more about the 5-3-1 index here and check out the air quality data from across Oregon here.

 

Thursday, June 9, 2016

DEQ issues air quality advisory for several Central Oregon counties

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality

News Release

 

 

Release date:  June 9, 2016

 

Contacts: Katherine Benenati, Public Affairs Specialist, Eugene, 541-686-7997, benenati.katherine@deq.state.ar.us

Jennifer Flynt, Public Affairs Specialist, Portland, 503-229-6585, flynt.jennifer@deq.state.or.us

 

DEQ issues air quality advisory for several Central Oregon counties

 

Central, Oregon -- The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality urges residents in Crook, Deschutes, Klamath, and Jefferson counties to take precautions from smoke caused by fires burning in central Oregon and California.

High smoke levels can create health problems for even healthy people so remember to limit your exposure to smoke by keeping windows and doors closed, reducing the time you spend in smoky areas and avoiding strenuous outdoor activity. The elderly, children and those with respiratory diseases can be particularly vulnerable to the effects of smoke.

Smoke levels can rise and fall rapidly, depending on weather conditions including wind direction. For instance, on Wednesday evening elevated readings were reported in Prineville where air quality readings were back to normal ranges – at least for the time being -- on Thursday morning.

People can conduct a visual assessment of smoke levels to quickly get a sense of air quality levels and take precautions.

A number of wildfires have occurred in central Oregon over the last few days, including the Akawana wildfire north of Sisters.

Visit the Oregon Smoke Blog for more information on active fires and air quality, along with tools to help people assess smoke levels in their area. The site is an effort by city, county, tribal, state and federal agencies to provide information for Oregon communities affected by wildfire smoke. You can also follow them on Twitter: @ORSmokeBlog.

 

 

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Wildfire smoke affecting Prineville

The Akawana fire, about 13 miles north of Sisters and four miles west of Geneva, has grown to about 2000 acres, according to the Oregon Department of Forestry Central Oregon District. Steady winds from the west are driving the fire, which was sparked by lightning Tuesday June 7.
The air quality rating in the Prineville area is currently moderate, while surrounding areas are still good. To keep an eye on air quality conditions in the area visit: http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/index.aspx or subscribe to Enviroflash Air Quality Alerts http://www.enviroflash.info/ to receive air quality information for where you live.
Earlier today the evacuation notice was upgraded from level one “get ready” to level two “get set.” People in the area should evacuate if the level is raised to three.
Updates on the fire can be found at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4772/
The Central Oregon District is also posting updates on its Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ODFCentralOregon/ and on Twitter (@ODF_COD).

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Wildfire smoke affecting Klamath Falls

Wildfire smoke may affect those in and around Klamath Falls. The smoke is most likely from the Draw Fire, which had grown to about 400 acres by Monday evening. Winds were hampering efforts to contain the lightning fire about 20 miles northeast of Chiloquin. The fire was originally reported around 8 p.m. on June 5.

Smoke may be visible and heavy at times in the areas around Chiloquin and Klamath Marsh. For the latest updates on wildfires in Oregon visit: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/state/38/.

 

wildfire season underway in Douglas County

The News-Review reports: “Wildfire season will be officially underway this week in Douglas County, fire officials announced Monday.” View the full article at: http://www.nrtoday.com/news/environment/wildfires/fire-season-starts-wednesday/article_50f6411c-2c1a-11e6-9da9-93590c78814b.html

Oregon Wildfire/Smoke Update 6/7/16

Oregon Wildfire/Smoke Update 6/7/16

This weekend’s hot, dry weather made conditions ripe for wildfires and serves as a good reminder that wildfire season is underway in Oregon.

Currently the Owyhee Canyon wildfire is burning about 38 miles southwest of Jordan Valley. Estimates put the size of the remote fire at around 20,500 acres. The fire is about 50 percent contained, but wind and lightning today could slow containment efforts. For the latest information on wildfires in the state, including prescribed burns, visit: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/state/38/.

High smoke levels can create health problems for even healthy people so remember to limit your exposure to smoke by keeping windows and doors closed and to reduce the time you spend in smoky areas and outdoors. The elderly, children and those with respiratory diseases can be particularly vulnerable to the effects of smoke. Find more tips and other resources at: http://public.health.oregon.gov/preparedness/prepare/pages/prepareforwildfire.aspx

Also, check out the hot links to your left to bookmark maps, daily updates, air quality alerts, frequently asked questions and more.

And remember to follow the Oregon Smoke Blog on Twitter @ORSmokeBlog.

 

June 7, 2016


Wildfire Season is here! 

Are you ready to protect yourself from smoke?

Check out the links on the left from the Oregon Health Authority to learn about how smoke can affect your health and actions you can take to protect yourself from smoke.

Are you concerned about whether its safe or not for school children to be outside at recess or participate in outdoor sporting events or practices?  Check out the link on the left for Public Health Guidance for School Outdoor Activities During Wildfire Season.

Do you know what the air quality conditions are in your area?

Subscribe to Enviroflash Air Quality Alerts http://www.enviroflash.info/ to receive air quality information for where you live, so you don't have to go searching for information.

Or, check out the Oregon DEQ Air Quality Map (top link on the left) to see state-wide information on air quality including 24-hour average and near real-time hourly information.

Check back here to find out information about severe smoke events from wildfires.