Thursday, September 17, 2020

Fire and Air Quality Map



The map above shows current fires and air quality at monitors around the state. The colors indicate Air Quality Index (AQI) health levels. The numbers you see when clicking on an icon are PM 2.5 concentrations, not AQI levels. For AQI numbers, visit DEQ's AQI or download the free OregonAir app for Android or iPhone. Round icons represent permanent air quality monitors, triangular icons represent temporary monitors (when deployed).

Wildfire smoke outlooks for Oregon | Pronósticos de humo para Oregón


Find the latest smoke outlooks from the U.S. Wildland Fire Air Quality Response Program for fires in Oregon. 

Outlooks are updated daily at the links below:


*Outlooks are produced by Air Resource Advisors deployed to active fires by the U.S. Forest Service. For this reason, outlooks are not available for every area of the state.

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Air quality update: Advisory lifted for Oregon Coast, smoke to remain elsewhere next couple of days

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Lane Regional Air Protection Agency and the Southwest Washington Clean Air Agency updated an air quality advisory Wednesday for Oregon and Southwest Washington due to smoke from fires in Oregon, Washington and California.

** Información en español **

DEQ has lifted the air quality advisory for the Oregon Coast. The coast should stay clear through the weekend. 

Health officials encourage people to open up windows and begin clearing out their indoor air once smoke levels have dropped into moderate (yellow) and good (green) categories.

Updated air advisories cover:

  • Western Oregon, Southwest Oregon and Southwest Washington, including the Portland-Vancouver metro area, Willamette Valley, Medford area, and Klamath Falls area. The advisory remains in place through end of Thursday and those areas should see clearing by Friday morning. Active wildfires may continue to produce smoke impacts for nearby areas.
  • Columbia River Gorge and Central Oregon. The advisory has been extended through Saturday morning. The area should clear by Saturday morning. Active wildfires may continue to produce smoke impacts for nearby areas. Fires can be unpredictable so DEQ and its partner agencies will continue to monitor air quality.
  • Northeast Oregon. The advisory has been extended through Saturday evening. The smoke should clear by Saturday evening.
  • Southeast Oregon. The advisory has been extended through Monday. The region may continue to see smoke from California fires until next week. 

Smoke levels have recently fluctuated between unhealthy (red) and hazardous (maroon) for Oregon and Southwest Washington. When smoke levels are hazardous everyone needs to take steps to protect themselves.

Health officials encourage people to open up windows and begin clearing out their indoor air once smoke levels have dropped into moderate (yellow) and good (green) categories.

Emergency managers are discouraging travel to lessen the spread of COVID-19 while allowing firefighters and other emergency crews to remain focused on wildfire. Relief from wildfire smoke should be coming soon to all parts of Oregon.

Smoke levels can change rapidly depending on weather. Check current conditions by visiting the Oregon Smoke Information Blog, downloading the free OregonAIR app on your smartphone, or going to on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s AirNow.

Smoke can irritate the eyes and lungs and worsen some medical conditions. Young children, adults over 65, pregnant women and people with heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions are most at risk. 

Protect your health when smoke levels are high: 

  • Avoid outdoor activities and stay inside if possible. Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Be aware of smoke in your area and avoid places with the highest levels.
  • Use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. These can be portable filters or can be installed in indoor heating, ventilation, cooling and air purification systems. You can also create your own air purifying filter by following these easy to follow DIY air filter instructions
  • Check with your local health department or this 211 list to see if they have community clean air shelters set up where people can get temporary relief from the smoke.
  • If you have heart or lung disease or asthma, follow your healthcare provider’s advice.
  • Consider leaving the area if smoke levels are hazardous and you have heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions. If you choose to leave the area, remember to take face coverings and hand sanitizer with you to help protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

Cloth, dust and surgical masks don’t protect from the harmful particles in smoke. N95 respirators that are tested to ensure proper fit and that are worn correctly may provide protection. Otherwise, they might just provide a false sense of security. They are not available in children’s sizes and are not recommended for strenuous activities. N95 respirators are in limited supply due to COVID-19. Additional information on wildfire smoke and COVID-19 can be found on the Centers for Disease Control webpage.

DEQ’s color-coded Air Quality Index provides current air quality conditions and ranks air quality as follows: Green is good. Yellow is moderate. Orange is unhealthy for sensitive groups such as children, seniors, pregnant women and those with respiratory conditions. Red is unhealthy for everyone. Purple is very unhealthy for everyone. Maroon is hazardous. 

Several highways and roads are closed around Oregon. Check TripCheck for the latest information.

The Oregon Health Authority asks the public to refill prescriptions at pharmacies and not to go to emergency rooms to refill them. They also advise that you refill them as early as you can and, when possible, keep extra on hand.

Media contact:

  • Dylan Darling, Oregon DEQ, 541-686-7997, dylan.darling@deq.state.or.us or Harry Esteve, Oregon DEQ, 503-951-3856, esteve.harry@deq.state.or.us 
  • Uri Papish, Southwest Washington Clean Air Agency, Executive Director, 360-574-3058, ext. 112, Uri@swcleanair.org
  • Travis Knudsen, Lane Regional Air Protection Agency, 303-523-2661, travis@lrapa.org 

Health contacts:

Contact your local public health authority or tribal government office for local information.

Monday, September 14, 2020

Air quality advisory for all of Oregon extended until Thursday [Aviso sobre la calidad del aire]

Sept. 14, 2020 - The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Lane Regional Air Protection Agency and the Southwest Washington Clean Air Agency extended an air quality advisory Monday for all regions of Oregon and Southwest Washington due to smoke from fires in Oregon, Washington and California. 

** Información en español**

DEQ expects the air quality advisory to last at least through Thursday. DEQ and partner agencies will continue to monitor smoke in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Smoke levels are fluctuating between unhealthy (red) and hazardous (maroon) for Oregon and Southwest Washington. When smoke levels are hazardous everyone needs to take steps to protect themselves.

Smoke levels can change rapidly depending on weather. Check current conditions by visiting the Oregon Smoke Information Blog, downloading the free OregonAIR app on your smartphone, or going to on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Now.

Smoke can irritate the eyes and lungs and worsen some medical conditions. Young children, adults over 65, pregnant women and people with heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions are most at risk.

Protect your health when smoke levels are high:
  • Avoid outdoor activities and stay inside if possible. Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Be aware of smoke in your area.
  • Use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. These can be portable filters or can be installed in indoor heating, ventilation, cooling and air purification systems. You can also create your own air purifying filter by following these easy DIY air filter instructions
  • Check with your local health department or this 211 list to see if they have community clean air shelters set up where people can get temporary relief from the smoke.
  • If you have heart or lung disease or asthma, follow your healthcare provider’s advice.
  • Consider leaving the area if smoke levels are hazardous and you have heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions. Otherwise, please wait to be directed to evacuate. Pay attention to evacuation notices. If you choose to leave the area, remember to take face coverings and hand sanitizer with you to help protect yourself and others from COVID-19.
Cloth, dust and surgical masks don’t protect from the harmful particles in smoke. N95 respirators that are tested to ensure proper fit and that are worn correctly may provide protection. Otherwise, they might just provide a false sense of security. They are not available in children’s sizes and are not recommended for strenuous activities. N95 respirators are in limited supply due to COVID-19. Additional information on wildfire smoke and COVID-19 can be found on the Centers for Disease Control webpage

DEQ’s color-coded Air Quality Index provides current air quality conditions and ranks air quality as follows: Green is good. Yellow is moderate. Orange is unhealthy for sensitive groups such as children, seniors, pregnant women and those with respiratory conditions. Red is unhealthy for everyone. Purple is very unhealthy for everyone. Maroon is hazardous.

Several highways and roads are closed around Oregon. Check TripCheck for the latest information.

Media contacts:
Health contacts: 
Contact your local public health authority or tribal government office for local information.

Thursday, September 10, 2020

Air quality advisory statewide for Oregon [Aviso sobre la calidad del aire]

Sept. 10, 2020 - The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Lane Regional Air Protection Agency and the Southwest Washington Clean Air Agency extended an air quality advisory Thursday for all regions of Oregon and Southwest Washington due to fires in Oregon, Washington and California.

** Información en español después de la información en inglés **

DEQ expects the air quality advisory to last until at least Monday afternoon. DEQ and partner agencies will continue to monitor smoke in the state and Southwest Washington.

Smoke levels are fluctuating between unhealthy for sensitive groups (orange) and hazardous (maroon) in these areas. When smoke levels are hazardous everyone needs to take steps to protect themselves. Areas closest to fires – such as Salem, Eugene, the Rogue Valley and Roseburg in Oregon, and Woodland in Washington – are having the worst smoke impacts.

The Portland-Vancouver area will likely have air quality worsen beginning Thursday evening or Friday. Air quality will also likely worsen in Central and Eastern Oregon starting Thursday. The Oregon Coast may see a little air quality improvement starting on Sunday.

Several highways and roads are closed around Oregon. Check TripCheck for the latest information.

Oregon Emergency Management officials are asking the public to only call 911 to request emergency services and not to call 911 to report smoke. The Oregon Health Authority asks the public to refill prescriptions at pharmacies and not to go to emergency rooms to refill them. They also advise that you refill them as early as you can and, when possible, keep extra on hand.

Smoke levels can change rapidly depending on weather. Check current conditions by visiting the DEQ’s Air Quality Index or the Oregon Smoke Information blog, downloading the free OregonAIR app on your smartphone, or going to on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Now.

Smoke can irritate the eyes and lungs and worsen some medical conditions. Young children, adults over 65, pregnant women and people with heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions are most at risk.

Protect your health when smoke levels are high:

  • Avoid outdoor activities and stay inside if possible. Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Be aware of smoke in your area and avoid places with the highest levels.
  • Use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. These can be portable filters or can be installed in indoor heating, ventilation, cooling and air purification systems. You can also create your own air purifying filter by following these easy to follow instructions: DIY air filter factsheet.
  • If you have heart or lung disease or asthma, follow your healthcare provider’s advice.
  • Consider leaving the area if smoke levels are hazardous and you have heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions. Otherwise, please wait to be directed to evacuate. Pay attention to evacuation notices. If you choose to leave the area, remember to take face coverings and hand sanitizer with you to help protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

Cloth, dust and surgical masks don’t protect from the harmful particles in smoke. N95 respirators that are tested to ensure proper fit and that are worn correctly may provide protection. Otherwise, they might just provide a false sense of security. They are not available in children’s sizes and are not recommended for strenuous activities. N95 respirators are in limited supply due to COVID-19. Additional information on wildfire smoke and COVID-19 can be found on the Centers for Disease Control webpage.

DEQ’s color-coded Air Quality Index provides current air quality conditions and ranks air quality as follows: Green is good. Yellow is moderate. Orange is unhealthy for sensitive groups such as children, seniors, pregnant women and those with respiratory conditions. Red is unhealthy for everyone. Purple is very unhealthy for everyone. Maroon is hazardous.

Media contacts:


Public health contacts: Contact your local public health authority.

Tribal and local contacts:

***

Aviso de calidad del aire a nivel estatal para Oregón

Estatal, Ore. – El Departamento de Calidad Ambiental de Oregón (DEQ, por sus siglas en inglés), Agencia Regional de Protección Aérea y la Agencia de Aire Limpio del suroeste de Washington extendió un aviso de calidad del aire el jueves para todas las regiones de Oregón y el suroeste de Washington debido a los incendios en Oregón, Washington y California.

El DEQ espera que el aviso de calidad del aire dure al menos hasta el lunes por la tarde. El DEQ y las agencias asociadas continuarán monitoreando el humo en el estado y el suroeste de Washington.

Los niveles de humo fluctúan entre insalubres para grupos sensibles (anaranjados) y peligrosos (rojo) en estas áreas. Cuando los niveles de humo son peligrosos, todos deben tomar medias para protegerse. Las áreas más cercanas a los incendios – como Salem, Eugene, Rouge Valley y Roseburg en Oregón y Woodland en Washington – están teniendo los peores impactos de humo.

Es probable que la calidad del aire empeore en el área de Portland-Vancouver a partir del jueves por la noche o el viernes. Es probable que la calidad del aire también empeore en el centro y este de Oregón a partir del jueves. En la costa de Oregón se podrá ver una pequeña mejoría en la calidad del aire a partir del domingo.

Varias autopistas y carreteras de los alrededores de Oregón están cerradas. Consulte TripCheck para obtener información actualizada.

Los funcionarios de Gestión de Emergencias de Oregón están pidiendo al público que solo llame al 911 para solicitar servicios de emergencia y no para reportar el humo. La Autoridad de Salud de Oregón pide al público que llene las recetas en las farmacias y no ir a salas de emergencias para llenarlas. También recomiendan que se llenen tan pronto como sea posible y, cuando sea posible, tener unas extras a la mano.

Los niveles de humo pueden cambiar rápidamente dependiendo del clima. Consulte las condiciones actuales visitando el blog de información de humo de Oregón (Oregon Smoke Information Blog), descargando gratuitamente la aplicación OregonAIR en su teléfono inteligente, o visitando U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Now.

El humo puede irritar los ojos y los pulmones y empeorar algunas condiciones médicas. Los niños pequeños, los adultos mayores de 65 años, las mujeres embarazadas y las personas con enfermedades cardíacas, asma u otras afecciones respiratorias son los más vulnerables.

Proteja su salud cuando los niveles de humo sean altos:
  • Evite las actividades al aire libre y permanezca dentro si es posible. Mantenga las ventanas y puertas cerradas.
  • Tenga en cuenta el humo en su área y evite lugares con los niveles más altos.
  • Utilizar filtros de partículas de aire (HEPA) de alta eficiencia. Estos pueden ser filtros portátiles o pueden instalarse en sistemas de calefacción, ventilación, refrigeración y purificación de aire interiores. También puede crear su propio filtro purificador de aire siguiendo estas sencillas instrucciones: DIY air filter factsheet.
  • Si sufre alguna enfermedad cardíaca o pulmonar o asma, siga el consejo de su proveedor de atención médica.
  • Considere abandonar el área si los niveles de humo son peligrosos y usted tiene enfermedades cardíacas, asma u otras afecciones respiratorias. De lo contrario, por favor espere a que le indiquen que evacue. Preste atención a los avisos de evacuación. Si decide abandonar el área, recuerde llevar con usted mascarillas y desinfectantes para manos para ayudar a protegerse a sí mismo y a los demás del COVID-19.

La tela, el polvo y las máscaras quirúrgicas no protegen de las partículas dañinas del humo. Los respiradores N95 que se prueban para asegurar un ajuste adecuado y que se usan correctamente pueden proteger. De lo contrario, podrían proporcionar una falsa sensación de seguridad. No están disponibles en tamaños infantiles y no se recomiendan para actividades extenuantes. Los respiradores N95 tienen un suministro limitado debido al COVID-19. Puede encontrar información adicional sobre el humo de incendios forestales y el COVID-19 en Centers for Disease Control webpage.

El índice de Calidad del Aire (Air Quality Index) con código de color del DEQ proporciona las condiciones actuales de calidad del aire y clasifica la calidad del aire de la siguiente manera: el verde es bueno, el amarillo es moderado, naranja es no saludable para grupos sensibles como los niños, personas mayores, mujeres embarazadas y personas con afecciones respiratorias; el rojo no es saludable para nadie; el púrpura es dañino para la salud de todos y el marrón es peligroso.