Oregon Smoke Information

Map Notes:


The map above is not able to show all state air quality monitors. To see the whole set, go to the left column, under Hot Links
and click on DEQ Air Quality map which will bring up a map with many additional state monitors. Round icons represent permanent state air quality monitors, triangular icons represent temporary smoke monitors (when deployed).


Monday, August 4, 2014

Oregon Wildfire Smoke Summary – August 4, 2014
Prepared by Rick Graw, USDA FS, Pacific Northwest Region

Synopsis: 
Over the weekend, haze was widespread throughout southern, central, and eastern Oregon.  In many places the smoke remained aloft, but did not extend down to the surface.   Klamath Falls and Lakeview experienced “unhealthy” air, while most other locations experienced “moderate” air quality, except in the western portion of the state where air quality remained “good”.
Today, air quality is not as bad in Klamath Falls and Lakeview as it had been yesterday, but the haze and “moderate” air quality conditions remain in much of the same locations (i.e., in the southern, central, and eastern portions of the state.  Air quality will remain in the “good” category in western portions of the state.
Tomorrow, a north wind will bring some relief to many areas, except those downwind of fires as shown in the graphics below.  Diurnal patterns resulting in evening cooling and night time inversions in the southern, central and eastern portion of the state will result in in smoke accumulating in valleys and basins during the night and early morning, with improving conditions late morning and afternoon with the breakup of the inversion.


Forecast Smoke Dispersion Patterns:
The figures below are from the experimental Blue Sky Modeling Framework created by the Air fire research group at the Pacific Northwest Wildfire Research Group.  They are best used to develop a relative sense of the dispersion pattern for the next few days based upon today's wildfire and smoke.   The light red should be interpreted to be relatively less surface level smoke than the darker red.  The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations shown below are a surrogate for smoke.  The existing large fires are indicated by the icon with the flames.

Model Predicted 24-hour Average PM2.5 for Oregon – Monday August 4, 2014


Model- Predicted 24-Hour Average PM2.5 for Oregon - Tuesday, August 5, 2014


Model-Predicted 24-Hour Average PM2.5 for Oregon - Wednesday August 6, 2014.


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