Oregon Smoke Information

Map Notes:


The map above is not able to show all state air quality monitors. To see the whole set, go to the left column, under Hot Links
and click on DEQ Air Quality map which will bring up a map with many additional state monitors. Round icons represent permanent state air quality monitors, triangular icons represent temporary smoke monitors (when deployed).


Thursday, August 17, 2017

Jackson Co News Release: Watch for Rising and Falling Smoke Levels

Medford, OR – Jackson County health officials and DEQ want to remind Jackson County residents to watch for smoke levels that are unhealthy for sensitive groups. It is important for people to be observant of the air quality during the wildfire season, smoke levels can rise and fall rapidly depending on weather factors including wind direction.

 
During a wildfire smoke event, Jackson County health officials and DEQ advise residents to take the following precautions:

·         Be aware of smoke concentrations in your area and avoid the places with highest concentrations.
·         Avoid smoke either by leaving the area or protecting yourself by staying indoors, and by closing windows and doors
·         Avoid strenuous outdoor activity in smoky conditions.
·         People exposed to smoky conditions and who suffer from asthma or other respiratory problems should follow their breathing management plans or contact their healthcare providers.

Check DEQ’s Air Quality Index to see real-time air monitoring data from monitors placed around Oregon http://www.oregon.gov/deq/aq/Pages/Air-Quality-Monitoring.aspx. Keep in mind that monitoring locations are limited, pollution levels may be higher in some areas, and wildfire smoke levels can rise and fall rapidly.

Conduct a visual assessment: People can conduct a visual assessment of nearby smoke to quickly get a sense of air quality levels by using the 5-3-1 index.  Residents will want to determine the limit of their visual range by looking for distant targets or familiar land marks, such as mountains, buildings, and hills at a known distance.  The visual range is that point at which these targets are no longer visible.  Once a distance has been determined, follow the guidance below:

If under 5 miles: The air quality is unhealthy for young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness. These people should minimize outdoor activity.

If under 3 miles: The air quality is unhealthy for everyone. Young children, adults over age 65, pregnant women, and people with heart and/or lung disease, asthma or other respiratory illness should avoid all outdoor activities.

If under 1 mile: The air quality is very unhealthy, and in some cases may be hazardous. Everyone should avoid all outdoor activities.

If visibility is well over five miles, the air quality is generally good. No matter how far you can see, if someone feels that they are having health effects from the wildfire smoke exposure, they should take extra care to stay inside or get to an area with better air quality.  They should also see their doctor or health professional as needed.

·         For more information on using the visibility index during wildfires http://www.oregon.gov/deq/aq/Pages/Wildfires-Visibility.aspx
·         For information on smoke and wildfires in Oregon, visit http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/  For information on smoke and wildfires in California, visit  http://californiasmokeinfo.blogspot.com/
·         For more information about wildfires and health threats from wildfire smoke, go to  http://public.health.oregon.gov/Preparedness/Prepare/Pages/PrepareForWildfire.aspx

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACTS:
Tanya Phillips, Jackson County Public Health, 541-770-7708
Katherine Benenati, DEQ, 541-600-6119
Date of Release: August 17, 2017/ noon

News Release: Curry County Health Officials urge residents to take precautions due to wildfire smoke

Curry Community Health, Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality are offering Oregonians ways to identify poor air quality conditions and tips to stay healthy and safe during fire season. Wildfires across the area can create hazardous and smoky conditions.

People with chronic lung or heart conditions, the elderly and children have higher risk of health problems from the fine particles in wildfire smoke. People who suffer from asthma or other respiratory conditions should follow their breathing management plans, keep medications on hand, and contact their health care provider if necessary.

Curry Community Health urges residents to take the following precautions to avoid breathing problems or other symptoms from smoke:
  • Be aware of smoke concentrations in your area and avoid the places with highest concentrations.
  • Residents can check the current local air quality conditions on Oregon Smoke blog <http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/. Avoid outdoor activities when air quality is unhealthy and hazardous.
  • To avoid smoke either leave the area or protect yourself by staying indoors, closing as many windows and doors as possible without letting your home overheat, and using a filter in your heating or cooling system that removes very fine particulate matter.
  • Avoid strenuous outdoor activity in smoky conditions. Young children and persons with heart or lung problems are especially vulnerable.
Persons suffering from asthma or other respiratory problems should follow their breathing management plans or contact their health care provider.

For more information:
Oregon Smoke blog, for the latest on fires across the state: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/

Social Media Resources:
Twitter: @RRSNF #ChetcoBarFire 
Facebook: /https://www.facebook.com/R6RRSNF/

Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5385/

CONTACT: SherriƩ Ward
Curry Community Health
Phone 541-373-8016
Email wards@currych.org            

Smoke Forecast for Chetco Bar Fire -- Aug. 17, 2017


Smoke Forecasts for Blanket Creek and Spruce Lake Fires -- Aug. 17, 2017

Smoke Outlook:  High Cascades Complex                                 
Issued for: Thursday, August 17, 2017 
Air Resource Advisor: Trent Wickman (twickman@fs.fed.us)

Fire
Blanket Creek Fire – Some growth is expected along the eastern and southern sides over the next couple days.  Water was dropped on the fire yesterday to keep fire behavior minimal.
Spruce Lake Fire – Minimal fire spread is expected as it finds scattered pockets of fuels.  Mop up and patrol status.
New starts continue to pop up in the area.  There are currently about 10 small fires in the complex.  Most are contained.

Smoke
The winds will be generally from the northeast in the late evening through early morning.  They will then become northwest during the day.  The same pattern is expected to hold through Thursday.  The numerous small fires in the area are leading to a general haze.

Smoke can be expected to move towards the southeast in the afternoon.  In the evening the smoke will drain down the valleys such as: the Wood River toward Chiloquin and Klamath Falls and the Upper Rogue towards Prospect and Shady Cove.  

Tourists at Crater Lake National Park will be able to view and smell smoke. Visitors should check for road closures and other announcements ahead of time.  Visitors can check https://www.nps.gov/crla/planyourvisit/conditions.htm for updates.

Air Quality Outlook
Sites with air quality monitors
Site
Wednesday
August 16, 2017
Thursday
August 17, 2017
Friday
August 18, 2017
Notes for Thursday’s forecast
Ashland
Moderate
Moderate
Moderate

Medford
Moderate
Moderate
Moderate

Shady Cove
Moderate
Moderate
Moderate
Most severe impacts in the overnight/early morning
Prospect
No data
USG
USG
Most severe impacts in the overnight/early morning
Crater Lake NP (visitor center)
USG
USG
USG
Most severe impacts in the overnight/early morning
Chiloquin
USG
USG
USG
Most severe impacts in the overnight/early morning
Disclaimer: Conditions may change quickly. These predictions are based on anticipated weather and fire activity. AQI estimates for sites do not represent a full 24-hour time period.  Instead they reflect a period of time within the day where smoke impacts would be greatest.
AQI Index
Actions to Protect Yourself
Good
None

Moderate
Unusually sensitive people should consider reducing prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.
Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups*- USG
People with heart or lung disease, children and older adults should reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.  Everyone else should limit prolonged or heavy exertion.
Unhealthy           
The following groups should avoid all physical outdoor activity: People with heart or lung disease, children and older adults.  Everyone else should avoid prolonged or heavy exertion.
Very Unhealthy

Everyone should avoid any outdoor exertion; people with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly and children should remain indoors.
Hazardous
The following groups should remain indoors and keep activity levels low: People with heart or lung disease; children and older adults. Everyone else should avoid prolonged or heavy exertion

*Sensitive Groups include people with heart or lung disease, children, pregnant women and older adults



Oregon Smoke Blog:
Oregon Dept of Environmental Quality
Blanket Creek Fire Information



Smoke Forecast for WIllamette National Forest Fires (Including Whitewater) -- Aug. 17, 2017


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Milli Fire bringing heavy smoke into Sunriver


The Milli Fire burning in the Three Sisters Wilderness brought smoke into Sunriver Wednesday afternoon.

People in the area should take the following precautions:

- Be aware of smoke concentrations in your area and avoid the places with highest concentrations. 

- Avoid strenuous outdoor activity in smoky conditions. 

- If you have heart disease, asthma or other respiratory ailments, or are over 65, you have a higher risk of illness from wildfire smoke. 

- Small children and pregnant women are also at increased risk. People in any of these groups might consider leaving the area until air quality improves. 

- People suffering from asthma or other respiratory problems should follow their breathing management plans or contact their healthcare providers.



While residents can view current air quality conditions at 
http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/ , Oregon's monitoring network does not capture air quality conditions in all communities. For this reason, it's important for residents to gauge air quality conditions where they live and take appropriate actions to protect themselves. 
Remember, local smoke levels can rise and fall rapidly, depending on weather factors including wind direction.