Oregon Smoke Information

Map Notes:


The map above is not able to show all state air quality monitors. To see the whole set, go to the left column, under Hot Links
and click on DEQ Air Quality map which will bring up a map with many additional state monitors. Round icons represent permanent state air quality monitors, triangular icons represent temporary smoke monitors (when deployed).


Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Oregon State Smoke Forecast for Wed-Thursday September 6-7, 2017

Issued:  Monday September 5, 2017
Forecaster.  R. Graw, USDA Forest Service

High pressure and subsidence inversion and east winds continue to dominate our weather for Tuesday.  Fire activity has increased as expected and smoke conditions are very baed over much of the state, particularly in western Oregon as depicted by this morning’s satellite image as shown in Figure 1.  Ash has been reported falling in many areas, including the Portland/Vancouver metropolitan area primarily due to the fires in the Columbia River Gorge.  


Figure 1.  Satellite Image of the Smoke Over Oregon on Tuesday Morning.


Wednesday September 6, 2017

The thermal trough will move to east side of the Cascades on Wednesday, resulting in a reversal of winds in western Oregon.  This will result in improved air quality  in the the central and northern portions of the coast and the Willamette Valley.  The day will start out a bit smokey in much of the state as illustrated in Figure 2. 


Figure 2.  Model-Predicted 3-Hour Average Smoke Concentrations for the period 7-10 am on Wednesday, September 6, 2017




However, smoke will start lifting out of many areas by noon and conditions will improve as illustrated in Figure 3.  While the Cascade Mountains will continue to be smokey from the Washington to California Board, much of southeastern Oregon is expected to be free of smoke.  By  afternoon, some smoke is expected in the northeastern portion of the state from Prineville to Ontario. The Dalles will also experience relatively heavy smoke from the fires in the Columbia River Gorge.  

Figure 3.  Model-Predicted 3-hour Average Smoke Concentrations for Wednesday September 6, 2017 ending at 2 pm.



By tomorrow evening, smoke will move into many communities in central Oregon but clear out of eastern Oregon, as shown in Figure 3 below.  The central and northern coast and the Willamette Valley south to Roseburg should be free of smoke.

Figure 3.  Model-Predicted 3-Hour Average Smoke Concentrations for the Period 6-9 pm, Wednesday, September 6, 2017.


36 comments:

  1. Do you know approximately when smoke will move out of Portland? Any predictions for wind movements over the next five days? Have asthma and deciding if I need to fly out of here.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Excellent question. I am also having same question and wondering about leaving. Sounds like from the blog post smoke should clear by tomorrow night in willamette valley. At least that's what I got. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I think it will take through tomorrow to clear all the smoke out of the Willamette Valley, but after that, we should be much improved for the next 5 days. I'm seeing winds out of the west/northwest for that period. Of course, things can and do change. Weather prediction is difficult enough, but then throw in new fire starts, changes in fire behavior, etc. I post updates as often as I can.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Rick. This is really helpful! Keep up the good and informative posts!

      Delete
  4. What's your prediction for Trail/Shady cove Saturday from 4-10? Getting married and the ceremony and reception is outside...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You should see a forecast for Shady Cove on tomorrow's smoke report from the High Cascades/North Umpqua fires, posted on this blog.

      Delete
  5. Hey, Rick. Can I share your blog with Husker nation? We have a lot of people coming to Eugene for the game and we're getting pretty worried the game won't happen :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, of course. Who's going to win the game?

      Delete
  6. As of 5.00 PM Tuesday, a nice westerly breeze can be seen in Elmira. This should help move things along.
    And thanks to everyone for all the info on this site. It's very helpful

    ReplyDelete
  7. Excellent Rick. The weather forecasting and smoke modeling is such essential information. You and Katherine are doing a great job on the smoke blog. Keep it up!

    ReplyDelete
  8. What about the Rogue Valley? Any relief coming our way??

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thank you so much for your time and efforts. I'm going to share this a lot of people looking for more info here in Portland. Please if you can, give us an update on Portland in the morning? I would love to know if I need to go out and buy an air purifier! ☺ Thank you again!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. We in the Rogue Valley are the worst in the state for air quality. Medford just hit Hazardous at 7:00 tonight. Any extra insight (hope) for us would be appreciated. Thank you for all that you are doing!

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is absolutely ridiculous. We are literally sufficating in Southern Oregon. "It's the Climate"
    Any releif in sight?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No it's 100 plus years of fire supression. Those whom ignore history are doomed to repeat it. The forests unfortunately need to burn. No amount of fire fighting, controlled burns, thinn8ng projects are going to eqalize the situation. Mother nature will if allowed return to fire resistant mosaic land pattern.

      Peace and yes a breath of fresh are is well needed at this point

      Delete
  12. Eugene has been over 400 several times the last few days, but it's finally starting to get better this evening. www.lrapa.org/216/Todays-Current-Air-Quality

    ReplyDelete
  13. This is so encouraging for us in Eugene! Thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agreed BD6. Our air quality in Sweet Home has been horrid for the past two days, but nothing compared to what Eugeneans have been suffering (as well as many other parts of the state). We purchased N95 masks so we could resume our evening walk tonight. I am not sure why but this smoke forecast was not available to me until now. I have been refreshing the page every half hour all day long. Traffic on this site and on the DEQ site has drastically affected the ability to get real time information. Hopefully the current problems can be corrected for the future so citizens can log-on to these sites and get current information. The information provided on this site, and the DEQ site have been vital these past few days, and the information they provide is invaluable. Unfortunately, their sites cannot handle the traffic we have provided. Another site that might be helpful to all of us is a "wind" website, that shows actual, real-time wind flow. Between this site, the DEQ site, and the wind site, it is possible for us "lay-persons" to make our own hour-by-hour predictions. Here is the link to the wind website: http://hint.fm/wind/

      Delete
  14. So, do you think the people in charge should keep their jobs?, the ones that said, we will let go, and watch it to see what happens, see if it will die out... ? and Why have they not contracted Global Super Tanker?? check them out http://globalsupertanker.com/b747-400-supertanker/ they can be on any U.S.site in less than 3 hours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the chetco bar fire was spotted at a quarter acre. The feds decided to let it burn. Why does this man not lose his job! Why is there no accountability. As for the rest once they're going they're hard to put out you can't just put super tankers on them and they're gone but they sure could have stopped the chetco bar with an aggressive helicopter campaign when it was a quarter acre

      Delete
  15. Probably hundreds of fires in all and some at over a hundred thousand acres each. That would take a lot of supertankers. Not to mention the reluctance of most people to actually consider paying for it, i.e. more taxes to support public services. (evil Gub-mint)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oregon voters are ridiculous when it comes to paying and or raising taxes. Still, the refunding of national parks hurts. As Smokey states, "it's up to you to fight forest fires. No really. You're on your own. We've been defunded."

      Delete
    2. ^lol

      Also, you can see even here people saying "well it's the climate" with sarcasm. And it is.

      Delete
  16. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Expect smoky conditions from Port Orford to Crescent City. We're currently camped at Cape Blanco Campgrounds and occasionally have ash falling from Brookings fire. Headed back inland this Saturday when air quality lifts to 'moderate'.

      Delete
  17. Rick -- Thanks for your reports. If possible, please always include Southern and Southwest Oregon, especially the Rogue Valley. We are among the hardest hit, with uncontained fires all around us. I'm studying predictions and reports several times a day. They help with managing care of the elderly, kids, and life in general right now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've purposely tried not to provide too much detail in the forecasts for locations where the Air Resource Advisors are providing forecasts. Look for smoke forecasts from the Chetco Bar Fire and the Miller Complex to see specific forecasts for southwest Oregon. The smoke forecasts for the High Cascades/North Umpqua fires include Klamath Falls and some other locations in the southern Cascades. These reports are posted on this blog daily.

      Delete
  18. Klamath Falls, we can't see across the lake have hit 544 AQI so many fires around us. Global warming is here, but still people in Oregon won't vote for tax to get help. I am 63 and with health issues can't even go outside now.

    ReplyDelete
  19. What is smoke forecast for Madras Oregon?

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hey guys..
    My girlfriend and I are from Vancouver and are travelling and camping down the coast on highway 101 for 6 weeks. Any news on how it will be for us in the next week or two? Let us know we would appreciate it. Much love!

    ReplyDelete

    ReplyDelete
  21. We need a report for Medford-Ashland or Southern Oregon. There's no report on it. The AQI here is worst in the state. We are feeling the effects of 350-370 AQI at the moment.

    We need relief. Will we get one?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Owners of private property have offered to get ahead of the fires with their in equipment and been told to STAND DOWN.

    "Waiting to see" what happens implies TOTAL ignorance of fire behavior. I can't believe what we're witnessing.

    Something's very WRONG with how this season was handled.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thank you very much for sharing information that will be much helpful for making coursework my effective.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I just want to say that the little to nothing rain we got in Grants Pass, OR pushed the smoke down to the valley floor. So it just made the conditiins even worse.

    ReplyDelete
  25. We live in Crescent, Oregon. The smoke on Highway 97 yesterday between La pine and Crescent gave us about 3/10's of a mile visibility. It was so thick at times that the driving conditions were hazardous. We seem to be in a forgotten area when it comes to weather, air quality reports, and the effect of the fires in our area by the media. We had very heavy thunderstorms last evening, thankfully there was quite a bit of rain with them. We are on alert and very mindful locally of this horrific fire season. Pray for the fire fighters that are battling the fires for all of us.

    ReplyDelete