Oregon Smoke Information

Map Notes:


The map above is not able to show all state air quality monitors. To see the whole set, go to the left column, under Hot Links
and click on DEQ Air Quality map which will bring up a map with many additional state monitors. Round icons represent permanent state air quality monitors, triangular icons represent temporary smoke monitors (when deployed).


Sunday, September 3, 2017

Oregon State Smoke Forecast for Monday -Tuesday Sept. 4-5, 2017

Issued:  Sept. 3, 2017
Forecaster: R. Graw, USDA Forest Service

As of Sunday morning, there were 14 large uncontained, large fires in Oregon and eight new fires. Several of these large fires consists of multiple fires referred to as complexes.   Most of these fires extend north to south in the Cascade Mountains from the Washington to California border, as shown in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1.  Fires in Oregon as of Sunday morning, Sept. 3, 2017

 


 Monday, Sept. 4, 2017

A ridge of high pressure will remain over the state on Monday, as hot temperatures continue over the holiday weekend. This will cause a subsidence inversion and poor mixing of the atmosphere all day, keeping smoke trapped in the lower layers of the atmosphere.

Overnight tonight, nighttime drainage flows will bring smoke into their usual spots. By mid morning, smoke will begin to disperse as shown in Figure 2. For the western portion of the state, winds will be out of the north all day. This will bring  good air quality over the central and northern coast and Willamette Valley, but heavy smoke will continue to be present over Southwest Oregon, and the Central and Southern Cascades. An east wind will help keep Central and Eastern Oregon free of smoke all day. The Columbia River Gorge will experience some overnight drainage flows down Eagle Creek overnight, but then the north wind will bring some smoke into the Gorge all the way to Pendleton and as far south as Bend by evening.

Figure 2.  Model-Predicted 24-hour Average Smoke Concentrations for Monday Sept. 4, 2017
 
 
 

Tuesday Sept. 5, 2017

Easterly winds in the Cascades and the Gorge will start to increase as high pressure builds east of the Cascades and the thermal trough builds up into the Willamette Valley. This will transport  much of the smoke from the Cascades into the western portion of the state out to the coast, as shown in Figure 3. The new Eagle Creek fire in the Columbia River Gorge along with smoke from the other fires will diminish air quality in the Willamette Valley. All locations on the Oregon Coast are likely to experience some smoke and haze. However, much of Central Oregon and Eastern Oregon should experience good air quality, except for some light smoke from LaGrande to Ontario.

Figure 3.  Model-Predicted 24-Hour Average Smoke Concentrations for Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017



Please refer to the Air Resource Advisor Reports on this blog for more detailed forecasts associated with individual fires. 
 
Disclaimer: Weather and fire activity can change quickly. Please check back for updates to these forecasts as conditions change. If you’re traveling out of Oregon, many other states also have smoke blogs, including California, Washington, and Idaho. So please consider those resources to help you plan your travels.




36 comments:

  1. Thank you, so much for maintaining this this invaluable site!

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    1. I live in Eugene. I have breathing difficulty from an injured lung. ( car accident). This is very helpful information.

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    2. Thanks. You should also take a look at the Lane Regional Air Protection Agency (their monitors are on the map above too) http://www.lrapa.org/

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  2. Excellent Information to keep us updated- THANKS!

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    1. Thanks we're posting statewide updates regularly and fire-specific ones each day. Glad you find them useful.

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    2. How does one get the most recent posts?
      Thanks

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    3. You can subscribe to the feed (the little orange button above), follow us on Twitter @ORSmokeBlog or just check back regularly.

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  3. Grateful for this information! Thank you. We live in Medford.

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    1. Thanks Corrine. I know you guys are getting lots of smoke down there. Stay safe!

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  4. Thank you! From Salem. This information helps us to plan the next few days, we have family members with asthma, etc

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  5. Really appreciate your hard work!

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    1. You're welcome. Glad you're finding the forecasts useful.

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  6. Thank you for the updates and info.
    Greatly appreciated!

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  7. Adding to the chorus of thanks; Y'all are doing the Lord's work, as they say.

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  8. Anyone able to locate the source of the fire map with the names of the fires on it? Tried all the links in the sidebar and none lead to it...

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    1. https://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/firemap.aspx

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    2. I use the following, works great. https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/20/

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    3. Thanks everyone for sharing that link. Very useful site. Here's a good map too: https://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/interactivemap/index.html?webmap=ed0a7dad32fe4848b20c6f91c74c79ea

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  9. That's it...love the Internet...and all those who contribute to make it what it is...thanks!

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  10. Thanks! We are vacationing in The Dallas and this blog is helping us make the best of it.

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  11. Thank you for doing this. My home where I lived for 30 years is Washington with a few years in Oregon.. .... I now live in Chicago but still have family and many friends out there. So this is so valuable to me. Thank you!! Nancy.

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  12. It is fairly hazy in Ontario Oregon right now. Not much of a breeze to clear the smoke as stated above. The sun has that eerie filtered look to it.

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    1. I'm on the Coast and it's even a bit eerie over here.

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  13. Thank you from Chiloquin. It has been thick here the last few days.

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    1. You guys have been pretty socked in. Hang in there!

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  14. Totally contradictory information for Sisters, Oregon. The maps at the top and bottom of the webpage show very different forecasts for Sisters/Bend/Redmond. And while the color coding for Sisters shows Unhealthy air forecast for Monday, the text says *Very* Unhealthy. What am I to believe?

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    1. Sorry for the late reply. We have an updated statewide forecast: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/2017/09/oregon-state-smoke-forecast-for-monday_4.html I see the discrepancy you're referring to and will let the forecaster know. If that happens again, remember you can check real-time conditions on the map above and with the conditions you have you may want to err on the side of caution.

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  15. Thank you for sharing this information it's greatly appreciated. I am down in the Roseburg area and suffer from asthma so this information helps me plan on whether I can go out or not. Its nice to have another outlet to check other than the news broad cast. I went out the other day when they said we were in the good/green zone and suffered bad attack all evening. So hoping the state can get blanketed with some rain.

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    1. You're welcome. I wanted to make sure you saw the revised forecasts. Conditions change rapidly and our forecaster is doing his darnedest to keep up: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/2017/09/oregon-state-smoke-forecast-for-monday_4.html

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